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Czech President pays respects to victims of Nanjing Massacre

President Milos Zeman of the Czech Republic visits the Memorial Hall of the Victims in Nanjing Massacre by Japanese Invaders on Tuesday in Nanjing, Jiangsu province, paying tribute and bowing to the victims. Thousands of victims were buried near the memorial.

Czech President Milos Zeman Tuesday visited the Memorial Hall for the Victims of the Nanjing Massacre in East China’s Jiangsu province.

Zeman became the first incumbent foreign president, and second foreign head of state following Queen of Denmark Margrethe II in 2014, to visit the hall, which commemorates the more than 300,000 Chinese lives taken by Japanese invaders when they occupied the city from Dec 13, 1937.

Zeman was invited by Chinese President Xi Jinping to attend the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation in Beijing.

Czech President Milos Zeman and his wife Ivana Zemanova lay a wreath at the Memorial Hall for the Victims of the Nanjing Massacre in Nanjing, East China’s Jiangsu province, May 16, 2017.

Czech President Milos Zeman signs the guest book while visiting the Memorial Hall for the Victims of the Nanjing Massacre in Nanjing, East China’s Jiangsu province, May 16, 2017.

 

Czech gov’t plans to enhance protection of busy places

PRAGUE, April 19  — The Czech government on Wednesday approved a plan of enhancing the protection of places with a high concentration of people against potential terror attacks, including preventive measures such as information campaign and instruction courses, Prime Minister Bohuslav Sobotka wrote on his twitter.

Sobotka said the new plan is another step the government has taken to enhance security against new threats.

The plan wants to create a national system of soft targets protection that would enable a flexible, complex and rapid response to threatening attacks. It also aims to reduce inflicted damage maximally.

According to the Czech Interior Ministry, the state and society must prepare for potential terror attack, in view of attackers’ current tendency to hit easily accessible targets. Soft targets are places with a high concentration of people that have not been permanently protected and are easily accessible, such as shopping, cultural and sports centres, hospitals, clubs, schools, tourist sights and public transport premises.

The Czech government approved an anti-terror package of measures aiming to reduce the risk of terror attack in 2016. Czech police set a permanent phone line last year to give security advice to owners and operators of publicly accessible sites and organisers of sports, cultural and other events.